Difference between revisions of "Five elements"

From Rigpa Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m (In Vajrayana)
 
(3 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 2: Line 2:
 
'''Five elements''' (Tib. [[བྱུང་བ་ལྔ་]], [[Wyl.]] '' 'byung ba lnga'', ''jungwa nga'') — the outer elements that constitute all matter. They are:
 
'''Five elements''' (Tib. [[བྱུང་བ་ལྔ་]], [[Wyl.]] '' 'byung ba lnga'', ''jungwa nga'') — the outer elements that constitute all matter. They are:
  
*'''earth''' (Skt. ''pṛthivī''; Wyl. ''sa'')
+
*'''earth''' (Skt. ''pṛthivī''; Tib. ས་, Wyl. ''sa'')
*'''water''' (Skt. ''ab''; Wyl. ''chu'')
+
*'''water''' (Skt. ''ab''; Tib. ཆུ་, Wyl. ''chu'')
*'''fire''' (Skt. ''tejas''; Wyl. ''me'')
+
*'''fire''' (Skt. ''tejas''; Tib. མེ་, Wyl. ''me'')
*'''air''' (or wind) (Skt. vāyu; Wyl. ''rlung'') and  
+
*'''air''' (or wind) (Skt. vāyu; Tib. རླུང་, Wyl. ''rlung'') and  
*'''space''' (Skt. ''ākāśa''; ''nam mkha<nowiki>'</nowiki>'')
+
*'''space''' (Skt. ''ākāśa''; Tib. ནམ་མཁ་་, Wyl. ''nam mkha<nowiki>'</nowiki>'')
  
 
These outer elements interact with the inner elements within our own physical body, and the potential and quality of these five elements also exist within our mind.
 
These outer elements interact with the inner elements within our own physical body, and the potential and quality of these five elements also exist within our mind.
  
Mind’s ability to serve as the ground for all experience is the quality of earth; its continuity and adaptability is water; its clarity and capacity to perceive is fire; its continuous movement is air; and its unlimited [[emptiness]] is space.
+
[[Mind]]’s ability to serve as the ground for all experience is the quality of earth; its continuity and adaptability is water; its clarity and capacity to perceive is fire; its continuous movement is air; and its unlimited [[emptiness]] is space.
  
 
==In Vajrayana==
 
==In Vajrayana==
In the [[Vajrayana]] the five elements are understood to be, and perceived as the '''five female buddhas''' or '''five mothers''':
+
In the [[Vajrayana]] the five elements are understood to be, and perceived as the [[Five female buddhas]] or '''five mothers''':
  
 
#[[Buddhalochana]] (Tib. ''Sangyé chenma'') the consort of [[Akshobhya]], who represents the purity of the element '''earth'''
 
#[[Buddhalochana]] (Tib. ''Sangyé chenma'') the consort of [[Akshobhya]], who represents the purity of the element '''earth'''

Latest revision as of 20:20, 18 March 2017

General Purification Mantra.jpg

Five elements (Tib. བྱུང་བ་ལྔ་, Wyl. 'byung ba lnga, jungwa nga) — the outer elements that constitute all matter. They are:

  • earth (Skt. pṛthivī; Tib. ས་, Wyl. sa)
  • water (Skt. ab; Tib. ཆུ་, Wyl. chu)
  • fire (Skt. tejas; Tib. མེ་, Wyl. me)
  • air (or wind) (Skt. vāyu; Tib. རླུང་, Wyl. rlung) and
  • space (Skt. ākāśa; Tib. ནམ་མཁ་་, Wyl. nam mkha')

These outer elements interact with the inner elements within our own physical body, and the potential and quality of these five elements also exist within our mind.

Mind’s ability to serve as the ground for all experience is the quality of earth; its continuity and adaptability is water; its clarity and capacity to perceive is fire; its continuous movement is air; and its unlimited emptiness is space.

In Vajrayana

In the Vajrayana the five elements are understood to be, and perceived as the Five female buddhas or five mothers:

  1. Buddhalochana (Tib. Sangyé chenma) the consort of Akshobhya, who represents the purity of the element earth
  2. Mamaki (Tib. Mamaki) the consort of Ratnasambhava, who represents the purity of the element water
  3. Pandaravasini (Tib. Gökarmo) the consort of Amitabha, who represents the purity of the element fire
  4. Samayatara (Tib. Damtsik Drolma) also known as Green Tara, the consort of Amoghasiddhi, who represents the purity of the element wind
  5. Dhatvishvari (Tib. Ying Chukma) also known as Vajra Datvishvari or White Tara, the consort of Vairochana, who represents the purity of the element space

Further Reading