Difference between revisions of "Jinamitra"

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'''Jinamitra''' (Tib. རྒྱལ་བའི་བཤེས་གཉེན་, [[Wyl.]] ''rgyal ba'i bshes gnyen'') was a Kashmiri [[pandita|pandit]], who went to Tibet at the request of [[King Tri Ralpachen]] to take part in the enormous project of  translating texts in the [[Kangyur]] and [[Tengyur]] directly from Sanskrit into Tibetan. Together with the Tibetan translator[[Shyang Yeshé Dé|Yeshé Dé]], he is said to be responsible for translating 160 texts in the Kangyur and also many texts in the Tengyur. He also passed on the teaching of monastic discipline, including its pith instructions.<ref>  *[[Butön Rinchen Drup| Butön's]] ''History of Buddhism in India and Its Spread to Tibet'', Snow Lion Publications 2013.</ref>
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'''Jinamitra''' (Tib. རྒྱལ་བའི་བཤེས་གཉེན་, [[Wyl.]] ''rgyal ba'i bshes gnyen'') was a Kashmiri [[pandita|pandit]], who went to Tibet at the request of [[King Tri Ralpachen]] to take part in the enormous project of  translating texts in the [[Kangyur]] and [[Tengyur]] directly from Sanskrit into Tibetan. Together with the Tibetan translator [[Shyang Yeshé Dé|Yeshé Dé]], he is said to be responsible for translating 160 texts in the Kangyur and also many texts in the Tengyur. He also passed on the teaching of monastic discipline, including its pith instructions.<ref>  *[[Butön Rinchen Drup| Butön's]] ''History of Buddhism in India and Its Spread to Tibet'', Snow Lion Publications 2013.</ref>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Latest revision as of 11:12, 11 April 2018

Jinamitra (Tib. རྒྱལ་བའི་བཤེས་གཉེན་, Wyl. rgyal ba'i bshes gnyen) was a Kashmiri pandit, who went to Tibet at the request of King Tri Ralpachen to take part in the enormous project of translating texts in the Kangyur and Tengyur directly from Sanskrit into Tibetan. Together with the Tibetan translator Yeshé Dé, he is said to be responsible for translating 160 texts in the Kangyur and also many texts in the Tengyur. He also passed on the teaching of monastic discipline, including its pith instructions.[1]

References

  1. * Butön's History of Buddhism in India and Its Spread to Tibet, Snow Lion Publications 2013.