Difference between revisions of "Mutik Tsenpo"

From Rigpa Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
'''Mutik Tsenpo''' (Tib. མུ་ཏིག་བཙན་པོ་, [[Wyl.]] ''mu tig btsan po'') — one of the three (or four?) sons of King [[Trisong Detsen]], born to Queen Droza Changchub, and a disciple of [[Padmasambhava]]. He later became known as '''Tridé Songtsen''' (Wyl. ''khri lde srong btsan'') or '''Senalek''' (Wyl. ''sad na legs'') and succeeded to [[Mune Tsenpo]] as King of Tibet. He reigned for approximately ten years (from 804 to 814 or 817) and further encouraged the propagation of the Buddhist teachings in Tibet. He had five sons, of whom [[Tri Ralpachen]] and [[Langdarma]] both reigned as kings of Tibet. His second son, [[Gyalsé Lharjé]], was the immediate incarnation of his father, Trisong Detsen.
+
'''Mutik Tsenpo''' (Tib. མུ་ཏིག་བཙན་པོ་, [[Wyl.]] ''mu tig btsan po'') (761–815)<ref>As given by Derek F. Maher is his translation of Shakabpa's political history</ref> — one of the three (or four?) sons of King [[Trisong Detsen]], born to Queen Droza Changchub, and a disciple of [[Padmasambhava]]. He later became known as '''Tridé Songtsen''' (Wyl. ''khri lde srong btsan'') or '''Senalek''' Jingyön (Wyl. ''sad na legs'') and succeeded to [[Mune Tsenpo]] as King of Tibet. He reigned for approximately ten years (from 804 to 814 or 817) and further encouraged the propagation of the Buddhist teachings in Tibet. He had five sons, of whom [[Tri Ralpachen]] and [[Langdarma]] both reigned as kings of Tibet. His second son, [[Gyalsé Lharjé]], was the immediate incarnation of his father, Trisong Detsen.
 +
 
 +
==Notes==
 +
<small><references/></small>
  
 
[[Category:Historical Figures]]
 
[[Category:Historical Figures]]

Revision as of 09:20, 5 April 2018

Mutik Tsenpo (Tib. མུ་ཏིག་བཙན་པོ་, Wyl. mu tig btsan po) (761–815)[1] — one of the three (or four?) sons of King Trisong Detsen, born to Queen Droza Changchub, and a disciple of Padmasambhava. He later became known as Tridé Songtsen (Wyl. khri lde srong btsan) or Senalek Jingyön (Wyl. sad na legs) and succeeded to Mune Tsenpo as King of Tibet. He reigned for approximately ten years (from 804 to 814 or 817) and further encouraged the propagation of the Buddhist teachings in Tibet. He had five sons, of whom Tri Ralpachen and Langdarma both reigned as kings of Tibet. His second son, Gyalsé Lharjé, was the immediate incarnation of his father, Trisong Detsen.

Notes

  1. As given by Derek F. Maher is his translation of Shakabpa's political history