Twenty-seven root samayas

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Twenty-seven root samayas — In the Dzogchen tradition there are twenty-seven root samayas of the body, speech and mind and twenty-five branch samayas.

Chökyi Drakpa enumerates them in the following way[1]:

Firstly, there are three sets of three samayas related to the body.
  • The outer three are to abandon stealing, sexual misconduct and taking life.
  • The inner three are to abandon abusing your vajra family, including your own body; abusing the Dharma and other individuals, and striking your own body; and forcing yourself to undergo the hardship of extreme ascetic discipline.
  • The secret three are to abandon striking the body of a vajra relative, or criticizing ornaments they may be wearing; striking your vajra sisters or making sexual advances to the Lama’s consort; and stepping on or over the Lama’s shadow, or acting carelessly with your body and speech in the Lama’s presence.
There are three sets of three commitments related to the speech.
  • The outer three are to abandon lying, slander and harsh words.
  • The inner three are to abandon verbally disrespecting someone who teaches the Dharma, who contemplates its meaning, or who meditates on the natural state.
  • The secret three are to abandon disrespect for the speech of your vajra brothers and sisters, those in the master’s entourage, or the master himself.
There are three sets of three commitments related to the mind.
  • The outer three are to abandon malice, covetousness and wrong view.
  • The inner three are to abandon careless activity; dullness or agitation in your meditation; and clinging to the views of eternalism or nihilism.
  • The secret three are to maintain an awareness of the view, meditation and action throughout every session of the day and night; to maintain an awareness of the yidam deity; and to have faith in the teacher and love for your vajra brothers and sisters.

References

  1. LotsawaHouse-tag.png A Torch for the Path to Omniscience: A Word by Word Commentary to the Longchen Nyingtik Ngöndro by Chökyi Drakpa